The 5 Smallest Countries in the World You Are Welcome to Visit

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Forget about the biggest countries in the world even the elementary school kid knows. Today I am going to share a top five list of the smallest countries in the world that are not only petite but also full of incredible history and culture. And the best part is that you are totally able to travel there too! So if you feel intrigued what I am talking about, let me tell you a story about five little countries in the world.

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San Marino

Tiny of us know about this small country, and that is no wonder – it is minuscule. Despite the fact that Italy totally surrounds it, this little country truly has something to be proud of! In fact, San Marino is claimed to be the oldest surviving sovereign state in the world. Furthermore, it is also one of the wealthiest regarding GDP per capita and can be proud of the lowest unemployment rates in the world as well. So – although you can drive through this country in a day, San Marino surely has something great to show. Moreover, the climate there is just perfect as well!

Tuvalu 

Not let’s travel from Europe, and let’s get lost in the Pacific Ocean. Here we might find the fourth smallest country in the world – Tuvalu. This small and exotic country was once a British territory but became independent in 1978. Probably the only heritage left there of the British rule is the absolute only hospital in the country. Also, there is only very little roads there, and it might be pretty hard to travel there too. That might be a reason we can’t find many tourists there. But it is surely worth dealing with that since Tuvalu is so fascinating and beautiful.

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Nauru

Not so far away from Tuvalu, there is the third smallest country in the world with the name of Nauru. It is also a little island nearby the coast of Australia, and it is also very petite. In fact, Nauru is the smallest island country in the world, so the title is pretty big here. But some other titles are not so great. For instance, Nauru is also known as the country with the most obese people in the world, with 97% of its men and 93% of women being obese or overweight. Also, this country is number one with the world’s highest level of type 2 diabetes, with 40% of its population suffering from it. Not to forget the horrific rate of 90% national unemployment. But despite all that, Nauru is a one of the most beautiful Pacific Ocean’s pearls, worth visiting one day.

Monaco

The remaining two miniature countries are located in Europe and both of these countries you can walk through. Monaco is the second smallest country in the world, but it is highly developed and worth visiting. It is the monarchy as well, and it can be proud of the largest number of millionaires and billionaires per capita in the world. So it is surely very luxurious and full of all those casinos you could see in many James Bond’s movies. The climate there is perfect as well since Monaco is located on the French Riviera. So it is an excellent mini country without any doubt.

Vatican City

Vatican City, although technically is a country, is not called as one on a daily basis. It is quite simple to understand, since this smallest country in the world in located in the city of Rome. Yes! You can find a miniature county in the one of the largest cities in the world! The biggest part of the residence there are the members of Catholic Church. That is because this town is the heart of the whole Christian world – the Pope lives there and rules this small country as well. What is interesting about this country’s economy is that the remainder of it comes from the sales of postage stamps, tourist mementos, and admission fees of museums. So Vatican City is truly an amazing phenomenon worth to discover once in the lifetime.

 

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